Publications by Type: Book

2015
Chekroun, Mickaël D., Honghu Liu, and S. Wang. 2015. Approximation of Stochastic Invariant Manifolds: Stochastic Manifolds for Nonlinear SPDEs I. New York: Springer Briefs in Mathematics, Springer. Publisher's Version Abstract

This first volume is concerned with the analytic derivation of explicit formulas for the leading-order Taylor approximations of (local) stochastic invariant manifolds associated with a broad class of nonlinear stochastic partial differential equations. These approximations take the form of Lyapunov-Perron integrals, which are further characterized in Volume II as pullback limits associated with some partially coupled backward-forward systems. This pullback characterization provides a useful interpretation of the corresponding approximating manifolds and leads to a simple framework that unifies some other approximation approaches in the literature. A self-contained survey is also included on the existence and attraction of one-parameter families of stochastic invariant manifolds, from the point of view of the theory of random dynamical systems.

Chang, C. P., Michael Ghil, M. Latif, and J. M. Wallace, ed. 2015. Climate Change: Multidecadal and Beyond. World Scientific Publ. Co./Imperial College Press.
Chavez, M., Michael Ghil, and J. Urrutia-Fucugauchi, ed. 2015. Extreme Events: Observations, Modeling and Economics. Geophysical Monographs. Vol. 214. Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union & Wiley, 214. Publisher's Version Abstract

The monograph covers the fundamentals and the consequences of extreme geophysical phenomena like asteroid impacts, climatic change, earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, flooding, and space weather. This monograph also addresses their associated, local and worldwide socio-economic impacts. The understanding and modeling of these phenomena is critical to the development of timely worldwide strategies for the prediction of natural and anthropogenic extreme events, in order to mitigate their adverse consequences. This monograph is unique in as much as it is dedicated to recent theoretical, numerical and empirical developments that aim to improve: (i) the understanding, modeling and prediction of extreme events in the geosciences, and, (ii) the quantitative evaluation of their economic consequences. The emphasis is on coupled, integrative assessment of the physical phenomena and their socio-economic impacts. With its overarching theme, Extreme Events: Observations, Modeling and Economics will be relevant to and become an important tool for researchers and practitioners in the fields of hazard and risk analysis in general, as well as to those with a special interest in climate change, atmospheric and oceanic sciences, seismo-tectonics, hydrology, and space weather.

Chekroun, Mickaël D., Honghu Liu, and S. Wang. 2015. Stochastic Parameterizing Manifolds and Non-Markovian Reduced Equations: Stochastic Manifolds for Nonlinear SPDEs II. New York: Springer Briefs in Mathematics, Springer. Publisher's Version Abstract

In this second volume, a general approach is developed to provide approximate parameterizations of the "small" scales by the "large" ones for a broad class of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs). This is accomplished via the concept of parameterizing manifolds (PMs), which are stochastic manifolds that improve, for a given realization of the noise, in mean square error the partial knowledge of the full SPDE solution when compared to its projection onto some resolved modes. Backward-forward systems are designed to give access to such PMs in practice. The key idea consists of representing the modes with high wave numbers as a pullback limit depending on the time-history of the modes with low wave numbers. Non-Markovian stochastic reduced systems are then derived based on such a PM approach. The reduced systems take the form of stochastic differential equations involving random coefficients that convey memory effects. The theory is illustrated on a stochastic Burgers-type equation.

2010
Ce manuel s'adresse aux étudiants en L3, M1. Il présente les outils théoriques et les méthodes numériques utiles en sciences de la vie ou de la Terre. Des exercices corrigés en fin de chapitre permettent de verifier que le cours a bien été assimilé.
1987
Ghil, Michael, and S. Childress. 1987. Topics in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: Atmospheric Dynamics, Dynamo Theory and Climate Dynamics. Springer-Verlag, New York/Berlin, 485.
1985
Ghil, Michael, R. Benzi, and G. Parisi, ed. 1985. Turbulence and Predictability in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics. North-Holland Publ. Co., Amsterdam/New York, 449.